The watercolor paintings

I’ve put together a selection of my watercolor paintings from a couple of trips to Europe over the last year and a half.

IMG_7317

Rooftops, St-Cirq-Lapopie, France;   6×8″

Now, I don’t pretend to be or put myself out there as a watercolorist any more than I call myself a landscapist. I paint watercolors mostly when I travel or sketches in the studio*. I paint outdoors in the summer; landscapists are out there through-out the year. It’s what they do.**

IMG_7315I paint outdoors because it keeps my observation skills sharp and it’s great to be outside in good weather since my usual workday is in the studio the whole time. It gives me something to do when I travel that enhances the experience in the places I visit, and I have to believe it’s going to make me a better painter, in the studio or out.

IMG_7322

View of St-Cirq-Lapopie, France;  7×10″

 

IMG_5497

Cliffs At St-Cirq-Lapopie, France 6×8″

Church Tower, Krem

Church Tower, Krems, Austria. 7×10″

Bridge In Budapest

Chain Bridge In Budapest 7×10″

View of Koems From The Danube

View of Krems, Austria From The Danube.  7×10″

Along The Lot River, France

Along The Lot River, France. 7×10″

Five Cypress

Five Cypress 7×10″

IMG_5501

Church Tower, St-Cirq-Lapopie. 6×8″

 

* I did do some watercolors for the Don Quixote Kickstarter Project in 2012.

**   Jim McVicker, and Scott L Christensen are both landscapists I admire, among many others

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Taking Watercolors out with you

I wrote recently about painting outdoors with oil paint; today’s post is about taking watercolors with you when you travel. Below is what my kit looks like when it’s in my luggage or my day bag. I keep my brushes and pencils in a plastic zip lock bag that is inside a freezer bag, along with one or two sketchbooks, depending on how long of a trip I’m on. A complimentary airline travel bag is terrific for an array of equipment you’ll see below.

The block of Arches WC paper -140 lb; 7″ x 10″ – and a styrofoam portfolio that doubles as a backing board don’t fit into the zip lock, but travel well enough on their own, although sometimes I use a big rubber band to hold them together.

I take a small variety of brushes: #10, #6, #4 rounds; 1/2″ and #12 flats, a fan brush and a 2H and a 3H pencil.

In the airline bag I keep my paint tray, mechanical pencils, erasers, a stump, toilet paper or a paper towel, a few rubber bands, a big paper clip and a small plastic cup for painting water. If you forget paper, like I did when I shot the photo above, you can always pick something up along the way. One other thing to have if you’re using a WC paper block is a knife to cut the top page off your block, which you then slide into the foam-core portfolio/backing board. A butter knife will do, but a pocket knife is best. Especially if your pocket knife has a corkscrew.

The mechanical pencils and stump I use for drawing in the sketchbooks, but for laying in the drawing that I’m going to paint over, I use the #2H and #3H pencils because they are so light they kind of disappear in the paint. But my favorite thing in my bag is the set of 3 collapsible daVinci brushes:

The brushes themselves are quite good, they take up very little space and they are so cute!

Shown below is an alternative for carrying brushes that I use when I’m packing long handled brushes. The hard plastic case is expandable to accommodate whatever brush size you want

The backing board/portfolio for finished paintings and drawings:

A rubber band keeps the folio closed to protect your paintings.

That’s it. Go forth and paint. Don’t worry if it’s not perfect, and maybe not even good enough. Good for you for trying! Fact: The more you practice the better you become.

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The plein air paintings

To follow up the last post, “Learning to Paint Plein Air”, on what I take with me to paint outdoors, here are a few landscape paintings from this summer.

The most recent have a lighter tone, feeling more “airy” on purpose: I replaced darker colors like ultramarine blue, Courbet green, burnt umber and yellow ochre with cobalt or cerulean blue, cobalt teal, nickel yellow.

I picked up that tip from watching this Nita Leland’s video Creating Confident Color. I have been studying her book by the same name, hoping to learn things I can teach.

Walkway in The Park;
oil on canvas, 8 x 10″

Tree and Rock; Newton, MA
8 x 10″, oil on canvas

Waltham Commons;
oil on canvas, 11×14″

 

oil landscape

High Head, No. Truro; oil on canvas, 11×14″

 

 

 

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Learning to paint plein air: materials

I been going outdoors to paint plein air again this summer, both as a teacher and just for fun. Therefore, I’m also a student, trying to improve.

I thought I’d share what I take with me. Today I’ll show my oil painting kit, and next time I’ll show what I take for watercolor.

Oil paints:

This is the kit I use. A Julian French easel, still the industry standard, as far as I know.

materials for plein air painting French Easel, open

 

I love it. It’s compact, comes I straps for carrying, a zippered bag for traveling with it, and it can adapt to uneven terrain, if you’re standing in a slope for example. The drawer slides out, giving you access to the brushes and stuff under the drawer of paint.

Not shown, but other things you should bring with you: drinking water, a hat, small folding table or tv tray, folding stool to sit on, tape, a bag for trash.

 

 

materials for plein air painting; French easel, open
materials for plein air painting French easel, open showing palette and brushe

 

 

 

 

MATERIALS LIST for Plein Air

Paints  (small tubes)   

materials for plein air painting oil paints

Titanium white, Zinc white, Burnt umber, Burnt Sienna, Yellow ochre, Ivory black,   Cadmium red light, Alizarin crimson, Cadmium yellow medium, Cadmium yellow light, Nickel yellow,  Courbet Green, Sap green, Cobalt teal, Cobalt blue, Cerulean blue, Pthalo blue, Ultramarine blue

This set of colors gives me three color schemes I can choose to use: light and airy, bold, or earth tones.

Pencils (2B, 4B) and a sketch book

Canvases, panels, or canvas boards, whatever size you’re comfortable with. Bring an extra one.

Rags or a roll of paper towels or both

Brushes– the basics brush types are round, bright, flat and filbert

The brushes I carry are shown above, along with palette and painting knifes, and a couple of old brushes that create unusual textures:

materials for plein air painting Brushes

Hog bristle:

1@ #12 Bright, 1@Round//1 ea @#8, #6, #4 round, //2@ #8 flat

Soft synthetic bristle:

2@ #18 Flat, (only one showing)// 2 or 3 each #10, #8, #4, #2

4 palette/painting knives

2 dried-up brushes with stiff bristles for drawing into wet paint

Palette knifeor Painting knifefor mixing paints and/or painting with

Mediums or thinners  for acrylics:bring water and container:  plastic yogurt or Tupperware, for mixing and cleaning.  Gloss medium

For oils:  you won’t need a lot of painting medium: buy a jar of pre-made painting medium and keep the jar for future use. You’ll also want small tin cups that attach to your palette and a small (2-3”) glass jar or can with a lid to carry out your cleaner. Pour it into another jar or can, let the crud settle to the bottom for a day or two and pour off the clean thinner off the top.

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Thinking About A Painting From 28 Years Ago

A few weeks ago I received an email from a woman who, with her husband, bought a painting of mine, Violet Dawn (below), from the Peyton Wright Gallery in Santa Fe, NM, dated 1991. So, it would have been purchased in 1992 or ’93. She and her husband are looking at what will become of the art they have lovingly collected over many years, including quite significant names: Ruscha, Basquiat, Motherwell, Thiebaud, Kandisky, Brice Marden, and lots more. I am proud and humbled to be in such company.

As they are looking to eventually donate their collection, she asked me to write something about the painting they bought, Violet Dawn, to help facilitate registrars and curators wherever it may eventually land. Now, this is a painting I created 28 years ago! I dug out my box of slides, 4×5 transparencies, announcements and artists statements and got after it. Starting with the kind of motivation that’s powered by vanity (I am one of my favorite subjects to write about) I headed down a rabbit hole of memory. What I found there, and what I am to do with it will be the subject of this and likely more posts to come.

Violet Dawn, 48”x64”, acrylic on canvas, 1991

First of all, I’ll say that slides sucked. You can read more of my rant about it below.

But what’s more interesting is the mental and emotional process I went through, reflecting on how I saw myself then: my ambitions and goals, doubts and demons, the victories and the concessions I made, opportunities given – some squandered, some realized- and to put that next to how I see myself and my artwork now was a little disconcerting. Staggering might be a better word, because the changes in style and subject matter seem pretty stark. As does the fame and fortune I anticipated that hasn’t materialized yet. I accept that I did what I thought was best, but I wish now that I’d made different choices. Who doesn’t, I wonder?

Could I have dug deeper to find a way to continue doing what was popular, and seemed likely to have provided that most precious and elusive brass ring: a sustained living as an artist? Probably, since anything is possible, but since the past is immutable self-flagellation is pointless.

I didn’t realize then that if you don’t make the decisions about the artist you want to be other people will make them for you, either out of self-interest or in their effort to help. It’s difficult for a lot of us to know or see other people’s agendas when they’re offering help. Being over-sensitive, an introvert, a little naive about how the world (people) works, socially awkward when it comes to self-promotion, makes many of us are not the players the system was made for.

The answer? Belief in yourself, and practice, practice, practice until you are supremely confident in your skills? Sure. But continuing to show up to work, so the muse knows where to find you seems to be the first and best method for success in this field. Luckily this field gives us all kinds of ways we can define success for ourselves.

In the absence of making a living, gaining recognition, support from anyone other than family and close friends, we’ve been performing pirouettes of rationalization and modifications to keep going for years. Living outside the system has left us scrambling for much of what we do as artists. We find ways of convincing ourselves to keep showing up, at least for another day. In my recent case, having someone still happy with a painting after 30 years gives me hope that perhaps I’ve got one more painting worth making.

The rant about slides:

I found the slide of the painting and took it and 59 slides of other paintings and sculpture – 3 sheets of slides – to have scanned so I can I have a digital archive of my past work. I was struck, going through what was hundreds and hundreds of dollars on slides, remembering the many hours not only the actual photographing, but then taping and labeling them, organizing them to send out with statements and prices: this was the standard, accepted, affordable technology at the time, and now it’s been outdated for 20 years.

How long before we switch again to the next best tech, or has it happened and I’m behind the times? I suppose it’ll all have to be transferred again whenever that day comes.

Slides were a pain in the ass. We needed plenty of slides to send out, and mostly you couldn’t count on them being returned. You had to shoot enough of them to not have to have duplicates made, because every time you duplicated a slide you would lose fidelity to the image. Plus, in order to be sure you had the right exposure, you shot at the setting that showed the correct f-stop, then shoot them again at a lower f-stop, then again at the next setting that was a stop above the “correct” one. By now you had shot 7 or 8 at each which makes 21- 24 photos. For the first painting. Repeat for each painting, twelve paintings to document comes to, say 250 to 288, photos, each of which then needs to be developed, then the good ones had to be taped off so there was only the painting and black. No background, just black, so even if the painting was exactly the same dimensions as the view finder in your camera, you had to be sure you got all of of the painting, so the only other option was to shoot against a black felt backdrop.

Many of the same issues apply to digital “slides”: cropping, adjusting the color, and probably a couple other things I can’t think of, but it sure is easier and cheaper (once you buy the computer and software). So much easier, and better in every way.

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More WorkShop-Talk

This blog is about what to expect at the workshops.

First of all, please bring your own painting gear, including a pad of canvas paper, Or 6-10 extra canvas boards or used canvases. The point will be to practice so we’ll be doing a lot of painting. I suggest 11″ x 14″, up to 16″ x 20″, especially if you’re using the canvas paper or boards, but of course bring a size you’re comfortable with.

I will supply coffee and light snacks (not to be confused with lunch).

The Saturday will begin with a talk/lecture about the subjects of the workshop, explaining the things to practice to become proficient at each, and giving demonstrations.

Then we’ll practice. I will have a still-life set up, chosen to illustrate the lesson, and for those who can’t stand the idea of another still-life, I’ll have alternate sources available.

At some point in here we’ll have lunch. There are places nearby to pick up something or bring your own.

The rest of the day will be spent going over the lessons, so that by the end of the day you’ll understand more of the how-to of painting. Repetition, repetition, repetition is the path to muscle memory, which allows the artist to paint without having to think about every stroke.

The Sunday of the workshops will be spent either continuing what you painted the previous day or work on a project using the lessons of the workshop.

To register for a workshop please use the comment section below. Be sure to include the dates you’re interested in.

Here are the workshops outlined in more depth:

Workshop 1: April 27-28

Shapes into Forms: Learning to see shapes (2D) and develop them into forms (3D) and

Blending and Shading: how the light hits a form and describes it.

The essentials of painting are recognizing and describing simple shapes, as they not only describe objects but also move the viewer’s eye through the painting- that is composition. Solid forms are made from simple shapes by adding a light source and shading. Complex forms are made by combining simple forms, and overlapping forms creates palpable space. The essentials of painting are recognizing and describing simple shapes, as they not only describe objects but also move the viewer’s eye through the painting- that is composition. Solid forms are made from simple shapes by adding a light source and shading.

Complex forms are made by combining simple forms, and overlapping forms creates palpable space. Learning how to simplify what you’re looking at is crucial. From there you can organize the elements that make up the image.

Workshop 2. Composition: May 4-5

How to get people to stop, look, and stay longer.

You could it “the art of manipulation.” Large directional lines and variety in the intersections of shapes direct the viewer’s eye through your painting. Using examples from art history, posters and cartoons, we’ll look into how.

Workshop 3. Fabrics and Drapery: May 11-12

Using lessons from Shapes into Forms, we’ll learn about a specific case on how to use cylinders, mostly, to create a soft flowing form and how it bends and changes direction. In order to further describe different fabrics, we’ll touch upon painting textures, which is all about which brushes to use, how to handle the brush, and the viscosity of the paint.

Workshop 4. Reflections:May 18-19

Glass, water and chrome are the most obvious examples of reflections, which are defined by, in a word: fluidity. Most of the lines we draw signify edges in the physical world, with the exception of reflections (and shadows), which remain 2D. The shapes in reflections exist side by side rather than overlapping. Lessons learned: wet into wet brush technique, seeing shapes,

Workshop 5. The Art of Copying: June 1-2

Evert artist in every discipline learns by copying, so we may as well do it right. When we copy a painting we’re also copying the painter, in that we try to paint not just what the painting looks like, and not just how they painted. Of course the intention is to learn to paint by emulating their brushstrokes and style, but a secondary intention is to unlock secrets about how the artist made the choices they did: What did they emphasize, how, and why?

For reference on stealing from artists you admire, Google John Cleese and read “Steal Like An Artist” by Austin Kleon.

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Schedule for workshops

I will be teaching a series of 5 Weekend Workshops this Spring:

April 27/28:    Shapes into Forms: Learning to see shapes (2D) and develop them into forms (3D), blending and shading

May 4/5:           Composition (The art of manipulation): How to get people to stop, look, and stay a little longer.

May 11/12:       Fabrics and Drapery

May 18/19:       Reflections: Glass, water and chrome

June 1/2:           The Art of Copying (Not Forgery 101)

The workshops will be 5 hours Saturday, 10:00-3:00, and Sunday 10:00-2:00.

The cost for the workshop will be $150 for 2 days, or $100 for either day.

In order to register for any of the workshops please reply through the comment section below or contact me at wilson7945@gmail.com

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Spring Workshops

My horoscope told me yesterday that I should be more communicative, that to attract more people to my business I need to broadcast more. Since I and my accountant want me to teach more and sell more, I may as well take advantage of this “sign” and use the horoscope’s advice. Who knows? It may work out.

This is a new, one month old, as-of-yet untitled painting that was commissioned from an older painting seen on my website: michaelbwilson.com 

 

untitled

untitled oil on linen, 40”x32” 2019

If you’d like to commission a painting please leave a comment, or send me an email: wilson7945@gmail.com or contact me through my website. Thank you.

Right now I’m planning several weekend painting workshops for the spring. I don’t have the details finalized yet, but the costs will be somewhere in the neighborhood of $135 for each workshop, discounted for multiple workshops. Dates will be April 27, May 4, 11, 18, and June 1. I will make a formal announcement soon. If you’re interested please let me know. Replies to this blog post will receive a 10% discount on the cost of the workshops.

The weekend workshops will be set up so you can choose both days or just one, if you prefer. Saturday will be 4-6 hours of demos, practice lessons, and critique, with a break for a snack or lunch. Sunday would be a 3-hour day to finish any projects you began the day before, or to bring in a project you’re working on that relates to the subject of the workshop. 

Workshop 1:

Shapes into Forms: Learning to see shapes (2D) and develop them into forms (3D). Blending and Shading how the light hits a form and describes it. The essentials of painting are recognizing and describing simple shapes, as they not only describe objects but also move the viewer’s eye through the painting- that is composition. Solid forms are made from simple shapes by adding a light source and shading. Complex forms are made by combining simple forms, and overlapping forms creates palpable space.

The essentials of painting are recognizing and describing simple shapes, as they not only describe objects but also move the viewer’s eye through the painting- that is composition. Solid forms are made from simple shapes by adding a light source and shading. Complex forms are made by combining simple forms, and overlapping forms creates palpable space. Learning how to simplify what you’re looking at is crucial. From there you can organize the elements that make up the image.

new painting

Detail of new oil painting currently In-process

Workshop 2:

Composition (The art of manipulation): How to get people to stop, look, and stay a little longer. Using examples from art history, posters and cartoons, we’ll look into how large directional lines and variety in the intersections of shapes can direct the viewer’s eye through your painting.

Workshop 3:

Fabrics and Drapery: Using lessons from Shapes into Forms, we’ll learn about a specific case on how to use cylinders, mostly, to create a soft flowing form and how it bends and changes direction. In order to further describe different fabrics, we’ll touch upon painting textures, which is all about which brushes to use, how to handle the brush, and the viscosity of the paint.

untitled new painting

Detail of in-process oil painting (area shown 18”x22”)

Workshop 4:

Reflections: Glass, water and chrome are the most obvious examples of reflections, which are defined by, in a word: fluidity. Most of the lines we draw signify edges in the physical world, with the exception of reflections (and shadows), which remain 2D. The shapes in reflections exist side by side rather than overlapping. Lessons learned: wet into wet brush technique, seeing shapes,

Workshop 5:

The Art of Copying (Forgery 101):

Evert artist in every discipline learns by copying (Google John Cleese on stealing), so we may as well do it right. When we copy a painting we’re also copying the painter, in that we try to paint not just what the painting looks like, and not just how they painted it. Of course, the intention is to learn to paint by emulating their brushstrokes and style, but a secondary intention is to unlock secrets about how the artist made the choices they did: What did they emphasize, how, and perhaps why?

 

 

 

 

 

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The value of sketching

{*I found this beginning of a post in my draft folder and decided to work with it. However, in full disclosure I’m not sure I’m the author, except for the caption with “drawing 2015.” And I don’t know who the author is, but a tip of the hat to them.}

A sketch (ultimately from Greek σχέδιος – schedios, “done extempore”[1][2][3]) is a rapidly executed freehand drawing that is not usually intended as a finished work.[4] A sketch may serve a number of purposes: it might record something that the artist sees, it might record or develop an idea for later use or it might be used as a quick way of graphically demonstrating an image, idea or principle.

1.Notice or perceive (something) and register it as being significant;                                     2.Watch (someone or something) carefully and attentively;                                                       3.Take note of or detect (something) in the course of a scientific study.

 

Sketching is great for rapid idea generation.

Buffalo Ink019Buffalo Ink017

 

The key to generating many ideas is to withhold judgment of them as good or bad until your sketching session is complete.

 

 

 

 

First capture the ideas, letting them flow without worrying if they’re any good. Wait until you’re finished to judge and filter.Buffalo Ink016

 

  1. Explore the alternatives

Sketching offers you the freedom to explore alternative ideas. Early in a project it’s important to see a variety of different ideas so you can choose the best option. Sketching works well for this, as you can explore those varied ideas quickly.

  • Sketching is a luxury. Most people cannot draw (or at least are convinced they cannot draw). We do it because we can.

 

  • Sketching is a great way to use time normally wasted waiting in lines or on public transportation or even meetings or lectures.

Dandy drawing

drawing, 2015

This little sketch was the basis for 3 small ceramic sculptures. It was done rapidly on whatever paper was handy. I can’t really say why this little guy so infatuated me, but sometimes it’s like that: hundreds of other sketches have value only because of the time spent on the process, practicing, and some will be wonderful drawings in their own right. But very few will serve as inspiration for other pieces.
So what does this drawing do so well? It’s very    3-D: First of all the overlap of one leg in front of the other creates the feeling that he’s walking, ie movement. The curves at the waist line and the jaw pull you circling around to the back of the fellow, the nose covering part of the eye to our right, the 3/4 head view, the angled neck muscle and the telescoping shoulder on our left all pull the eye back and around.

 

 

 

In May I will be teaching a 4-session outdoor drawing class at the New Art Center in Newtonville, MA. 

Dates: 5/10/2018 – 5/31/2018 – 4 sessions.
Time: 10:00 AM – 12:30 PM
Workshop – Michael Wilson

Fill your sketch book with drawings of life as you live it! We’ll capture the likeness and spirit of a place or scene, using local architecture, landscape and people as subject matter. Enjoy the spring weather as you practice coordinating eye, hand, and mind. Critique sessions over coffee are an important (and enjoyable) feature!

View details on this and many other great classes for adults or kids here in the NAC catalog. 

 

{*I found this in my draft folder and decided to work with it. However, in full disclosure I’m not sure I’m the author, except for the caption with “drawing 2015.” And I don’t know who the author is, but a tip of the hat to them.}
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Loving “Loving Vincent”

 

On Friday night we had friends over to watch the Oscar nominated animation  “Loving Vincent”. I recommend it. A true labor of love, over 100 artists worked for several years to create an  absolutely amazing film. Before I saw the film the first time (I’ve seen it twice), I had hope, but with reservations. I didn’t think it’d be great but I was more than satisfied, I was moved nearly to tears.

Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait of Armand Roulin, November-December 1888, Arles,

Vincent van Gogh, Portrait of Doctor Gachet, 1890 // by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The film-makers Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman (both are credited as directors and writers) deserve a big thumbs up for creating a dynamic story line that is plausible in a historical context to tell the story of his life, using Vincent’s portraits and landscape paintings as the actors and scenes in the story. What a delight to see paintings I recognize drop into the film and start speaking and walking around.

 

 

Kobiela and Welchman, and all of the artists who worked on it, pulled off the painting style of Van Gogh magnificently. Van Gogh’s best work pulses with the life of the cosmos, (think Starry Night) whether he was painting trees, flowers, clouds or a face, the level of empathy was astonishing. Not merely describing movement, he absorbed what he saw when he was painting and he became an extension of it and it became a part of him.

The filmmakers did a brilliant job of taking advantage of how he painted, incorporating the movement of the paintbrush and paint into a driving force in the storyline, pulling us along. Taking a most logical next step: making those brush marks full of paint actually move, seems obvious now that they’ve done it. That they did it was such respect for Vincent and his art makes it a real, very loving tribute.

Loving Vincent can be seen on Amazon Prime. The film makes the case for Van Gogh having been shot accidentally by boys taunting him, rather than shooting himself, as the popular myth would have it. I heard that theory several years ago on a 60 Minutes interview with the authors of Van Gogh: The Life. Which I haven’t read, but, for what it’s worth I believe them.

 

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